Photoset

counttarantula:

Female Xenesthis sp. "Blue"
Photo courtesy of Jose & Exoskeleton Invertebrates
Photo
Fishing cat (Prionailurus viverrinus) in Tallinn zoo, Estonia

Fishing cat (Prionailurus viverrinus) in Tallinn zoo, Estonia

Photo
reblog-gif:

HQ Gif Blod - http://gifini.com/

The floor is a lava

reblog-gif:

HQ Gif Blod - http://gifini.com/

The floor is a lava

Tags: funny gif cat cute
Photo
Photoset

cool-critters:

Okapi (Okapia johnstoni)

The okapi is a giraffid artiodactyl mammal native to the Ituri Rainforest, located in the northeast of the Democratic Republic of the Congo in Central Africa. Although the okapi bears striped markings reminiscent of zebras, it is most closely related to the giraffe. A 2013 study determined there are 10,000 okapis remaining in the wild, down from 40,000 a decade ago. The same year, the okapi was reclassified as an endangered species. The okapi’s tongue is also long enough for the animal to wash its eyelids and clean its ears (inside and out). Okapis are essentially solitary, coming together only to breed, with the exception of mothers and offspring. Okapis forage along fixed, well-trodden paths through the forest. Okapis are herbivores, feeding on tree leaves and buds, grasses, ferns, fruits, and fungi. Many of the plant species on which okapis feed are poisonous to humans.

photo credits: wiki, zooborns, baynews9

Photo
My first DD wohoo. So proud :D

My first DD wohoo. So proud :D

Photo
rhamphotheca:

A rather large “Huntsman Spider”, most likely in the family Platoridae, Cuyabeno Wildlife Reserve, Ecuador
* Many of the other pictures I found of this species shows them feeding on other spiders. It seems that few of the people that photograph them actually know what species it is or in what family it resides. I decided to go with the family identification used by Science Photo Library’s photographer/biologist.
(photo: John R. Anderson)

rhamphotheca:

A rather large “Huntsman Spider”, most likely in the family Platoridae, Cuyabeno Wildlife Reserve, Ecuador

* Many of the other pictures I found of this species shows them feeding on other spiders. It seems that few of the people that photograph them actually know what species it is or in what family it resides. I decided to go with the family identification used by Science Photo Library’s photographer/biologist.

(photo: John R. Anderson)

(via sir-p-audax)

Photoset

sir-p-audax:

thatsnotatarantula:

spiders-are-wonderful-things:

A rainbow of tarantulas. Look how pretty.

They’re super pretty, but that fifth one is a plush puppet.

OH MY GOD IT’S A STUFFED SPIDER I JUST LOST IT

Plus you should know that the last one will grow up looking like that 

Photoset

libutron:

Blue-rayed Metalmark - Lyropteryx apollonia

Lyropteryx apollonia (Riodinidae) is one of those butterflies that are equally striking whether they are seen from both the upperside (top photo) or the underside (bottom photo) of the wings.

In addition to its stunning look, these butterflies have a peculiar behavior. Males are occasionally seen visiting sewage seepages or urine-soaked ground. They drink using the “filter-feeding” method, whereby they imbibe almost continually, extracting salts from mineral-rich patches of ground, or from the edges of puddles. Periodically they squirt the demineralized water from their anus, curving their abdomen so as to aim the liquid at the ground beneath their feet. There it leaches more minerals from the ground, which are re-imbibed. This process is continuous and the butterflies often recycle the same fluid many times during a period of several minutes.

The Blue-rayed Metalmark is widely distributed throughout the tropical regions of South America including Colombia, western and southern Brazil, Peru, and Bolivia.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: [Top: ©Jeffrey Glassberg | Locality: Apuya, Napo, Ecuador (2013)] - [Bottom: ©Andrew Neild | Locality: Apuya track off the main road from Tena to Puyo, Ecuador (2013)]

(via realmonstrosities)

Photo
B. vagans. Yet another man in my family ^_^

B. vagans. Yet another man in my family ^_^

Photo
fitspocean:

elletiburon:

sometimes when I’m angry or stressed or sad I think about whales just swimming around in the ocean, doing whale shit. like, they’re the biggest goddamn mammals on the planet. they don’t have time for little problems. there’s too much chill-ass whale shit to do.
basically what I am saying is that whales are my happy place.

That was so comforting

fitspocean:

elletiburon:

sometimes when I’m angry or stressed or sad I think about whales just swimming around in the ocean, doing whale shit. like, they’re the biggest goddamn mammals on the planet. they don’t have time for little problems. there’s too much chill-ass whale shit to do.

basically what I am saying is that whales are my happy place.

That was so comforting

(Source: p4cifc, via tryxal)

Photo
Grammostola pulchra, finally big enough to know the gender and we have a BOY! :D

Grammostola pulchra, finally big enough to know the gender and we have a BOY! :D

Photo
Young Psalmopoeus irminia, juat moved to a bigger place.
SO BEAUTIFUL

Young Psalmopoeus irminia, juat moved to a bigger place.

SO BEAUTIFUL

Photo
sdzsafaripark:

Baby Okapi Shows Off Stripes at San Diego Zoo Safari Park on Flickr.
Photoset

realmonstrosities:

The Dancing White Lady is a great, big spider from the Namib Desert in southern Africa.

They spend their days hidden in underground burrows and emerge at night to hunt for insects and lizards which they find by detecting the vibrations of footsteps.

These hunting expeditions occur within a short range of the burrow entrance, but males can travel over 100 metres in search of a mate.

He communicates with the female via the timeless medium of dance. Tapping the ground outside her burrow sends down vibrations that ask her to come out, but not eat him. She doesn’t always oblige…

…Images: James Anderson

(via mistressapocalypse)